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Covering the Central Highlands
Central West Queensland

Government & Schools

6 March, 2021

Reconciliation reflection

Central Highlands Regional Council hopes t-shirt artwork will spark reconciliation conversation.


Central Highlands Regional Council trainees Tneil Walter and Lily Pacey wear polo shirts with design by local artist Andrew Doyle. PHOTO: Supplied

LOCALS are being asked to join in raising awareness for Central Highlands Regional Council’s Reconciliation Action Plan. 

Residents are being encouraged to purchase a shirt emblazoned with Indigenous artist Andrew Doyle’s artwork and to share an image to social media with the hashtag #getyourrapon. 

Mayor Kerry Hayes said council’s responsibility for reconciliation extended beyond merely promoting the action plan but by providing a forum for discussion. 

“At the core of reconciliation sits a shared understanding that is the basis of strong respectful relationship we seek to build,” Cr Hayes said.  

“We are very lucky to have many talented Indigenous artists in the region, whom all share stories through their art.” 

Council’s plan coincided with NAIDOC week in 2020.  

Council strives to develop and enhance relationship with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island peoples. 

It also commits to learning and sharing Indigenous culture, history, and issues. 

Cr Hayes encouraged people to show their support for Indigenous artists. 

“It might be that you only learn about this story, or it might be a conversation started for more, or it might be the beginning of someone’s personal reconciliation journey,” he said. 

“It’s these stories that allow us to see the world through each other’s eyes and encourage conversations. 

“Whatever it is, it’s a personal as much as a shared commitment to respect and value the diversity and opportunities the region has to offer.” 

The blue and green circle represent various stages of life, from infancy to through to adulthood, with the various colours representing the difficulties faced in each stage. 

Themes of family, black identity, and adapting to the western world are also represented. 

  • Orders for the shirts will open between 8 and 29 March with expected delivery within six weeks; just before National Reconciliation Week. 
  • Cost is $37.50 per shirt plus delivery. 
  • The shirts are made-to-order by Indigenous fashion and merchandise provider Dezigna. Dezigna is on a mission to showcase authentic Australian Indigenous artworks and designs to every Australian and the world. 
  • Council does not profit from the shirt sales. 

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